News / art

In Praise of Fabric and Textile Arts and the Women who Create Them

It seems as though 'Fabric or Textile Arts' are attracting much more attention lately.  I myself have a somewhat new found appreciation for this often under-appreciated art form, so I'm quite happy to see the Textile Arts seemingly  enjoy a resurgence of sorts. 
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Re-sale Royalties - The Right Thing

Inuit & Indigenous Art always draws my attention and captures my imagination. I suspect that it has something to do with the simple honesty that I see.

In the many, many, downsizing and estate sales and auctions I've been to, I can't seem to walk or scroll past Indigenous pieces without at least trying to win them.  I'm not always successful but I do now have a very nice collection of art and sculpture.

I've hesitated to list these pieces for sale for a couple of reasons. Most of them feel quite personal to me and I'm somewhat hesitant to part with them.  It also feels somehow wrong to make a profit from artwork that I had no part in creating or from an artist's work who is in no way benefitting.  I suppose the same could be said for other vintage and antique items I've listed for sale but the difference for me is that manufactured pieces can't usually be attributed to a single artisan.  Artwork in general, and Inuit art in particular, is often signed and the artist can usually be identified.

It's generally agreed that artists receive the least amount of money in the original sale of an artwork. When a piece is resold, prices often increase as the reputation of the artist and the market grows.  Resale of that same piece can sometimes reach staggering numbers. The fact that collectors are willing to pay such amounts for these exceptional works is a wonderful thing.  A testament to the skill of the art community in the Canadian north, and the quality of the works produced there.  The artists who created these beautiful pieces however, don't receive any money when their art is resold. The sometimes huge returns go to the galleries, auction houses, brokers, etc., as they should for their part in promoting, organizing and increasing the awareness of this beautiful art community.  However, nothing goes back to the original artist nor to the community that produces and supports these artists.  That just seems wrong.

The Artist Resale Right entitles visual artists to share in the ongoing success of their art by providing them with a percentage (5%) of any resale of their art. Not an outrageous amount. $2.50 on a piece sold for $100 or $500 on a piece sold for $10,000.  To date, 59 countries across the world have endorsed the Artist Resale Right and legislation has been adopted to ensure this right for artists.  The Artist Resale Right has not been adopted in Canada nor in the United States, with the exception of California.  So, artists in North American generally receive nothing on the resale of their work.  Shameful really.  There's much more information available on this subject in the links below.

CARFAC Help Bring the Artist’s Resale Right to Canada
https://www.carfac.ca/campaigns/artists-resale-right/

Recommendations for an Artist Resale Right in Canada, November 2010
http://www.carfac.ca/carfacwp/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/artists-resale-right-proposal-carfac-rev-nov-23.pdf

Canadian Artists Representation Copyright Collective
https://www.carfac.ca/membership/copyright-collectives/

Nunatsiaq Online: March, 2012 -Nunavut government supports resale royalties for artists
http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674nunavut_government_supports_resale_royalties_for_artist/

Resale rights for visual artists can only help to nurture and promote the artistic community, which in turn will hopefully allow artists to create a sustainable living through sales of their work. 

In my tiny little world of online sales, I'm committed to establishing a system whereby 5% from the sale of any original art will be remitted back to the artist.  I'm not quite sure how I'll do that yet, and it would be a whole lot easier if I could simply file a return of sales along with any funds owing to a governing body, but I'm confident I can find a way and I'm open to suggestions.  This will likely represent a minuscule amount of real money, but it's more a statement of support for a long overdue initiative.  Ethical buying and selling....what a concept!

WithAPast

 

 

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Buying art versus stuff to fill up space on your walls

To be perfectly honest, I know very little about art.   I have no conscious sense of form, composition or light, nor do I have  any insight into what an artist may be trying to convey.  I'm not artistic or even all that creative.  But I love art.  In all its varied forms.  I'm in awe of the skill with which an artist can impart their vision onto canvas or into stone or music or their medium of choice and am intrigued by the different emotions and feeling their work conveys, different for each and every person experiencing it.

With one of my first ever pay cheques, from my very first full time job, I bought a small work from a tiny local gallery. I still have it some 35 years later, although the gallery is now long gone.  It evokes some of the very same feelings today that it did when I first brought it home, along with a few new ones.  Which is exactly why I bought it, and have hauled it along with me where ever I've moved, hanging it on a new wall in each and every place I made my home.  I've continued to buy small pieces of art over the years, based entirely on what I like and how the piece makes me feel. 

Art really doesn't have to be expensive. Some of my favourites were picked up from street artists from where ever I happened to be travelling, at music festivals, craft shows, and more recently at auctions. The common thread is always that each piece makes me feel something....happy, thoughtful, wistful......To me the sole purpose of art is elicit emotion or make a connection of some kind. 

So, I don't really get the appeal of mass-produced factory art.  The Ikea furniture of the art world.  Not that there's anything wrong with Ikea furniture....it's just not really meant to endure beyond the average length of time it takes to complete a university degree.  Disposable.  Superficial.  Mass produced.  It lacks that special something that an artist infuses into their work . It seems to be less about making a connection and more about matching the furniture. There really is no comparison though to an original work, conceived of and executed by an artist with the talent and skill to connect people and make them feel something.   What a cool way to make a living.

WithAPast

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